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Cap Juluca

Doesn't this Hotel look like it's in Greece to you? Surprisingly it actually is not in Greece. Cap Juluca is a gorgeous Hotel located on 179 acres of land and inland waters. Oh I would love to be this young lady on the terrace overlooking the gorgeous ocean view in Anguilla.
Cap Juluca
boutique hotel

Cap Juluca

Mell Lawrence Architects - Watersmark House

Mell Lawrence Architects

Watersmark House

After hunting through John's Future House Now the other day I came across Mell Lawrence Architects. John's feature on the Wild Haire Ranch House got me curious and their Watersmark House, a combination of old and new impressed me. The brickwork is impeccable and the combination of traditional and modern design make this house special.


Combining steel, stone and wood this house, despite being a new build, has the solidity and permanentness of an established mansion house. Breaking up the house into blocks and dividing it over levels descending the slope confirms that it's something the old master builders would not have attempted. This division allows for a series of landscaped courtyards to feature off each level, tamed in comparison to the natural forest in the valley beyond.

Layout wise, this house disperses bedrooms. Master on the upper floor then guests one level below the living room, kitchen and dining. A third bedroom, above the garage a perfect retreat for a teenage child.

Facing the sun, the upstairs master floor is wonderful with views above the canopy of trees out across the valley below. To the east a walk in wardrobe with bathroom in front (surrounded by glass), to the west, the bedroom and open deck for taking in the views down the valley. Connecting these two a conservatory (covered deck) and hall. At the Northern shaded back of this floor, the stairwell with office on the landing half way down. The stairwell's special too with stair being extended to form shelves.

Heading down to the main living area the kitchen with central island has a large window for checking on the BBQ across the sheltered courtyard formed behind the garage and house.
Dining and living rooms surround, then across a glass bridge to the secluded library, with panoramic views across the valley and down to the pool below.

I think its the combination of layout, attention to detail and high stud that has me with this house.

The beacon light on the garage is great too (parting image). A lantern guiding you home up the driveway.













A note from Mell Lawrence Architects on the project
This house embraces its naturally terraced site, capturing sweeping views to the distance and intimate spaces along the site. From the main entry, the house descends down the slope, with each room inside corresponding to a "room" outside. The main living area responds to a stone patio sited on a natural terrace. From the living area, a glass bridge leads to the library that overlooks a spa pool in the grotto underneath, where guest quarters open onto another small natural terrace. Upstairs, the private suite opens onto a screened porch, then onto a balcony overlooking the library and pool. This series of small boxes above the trees contrast the larger spaces anchoring the house below. Only elemental materials – wood, stone and metal – were used throughout the house, chosen by the architect to express the qualities of an older building; substantial, grounded, and well proportioned, with textural interest flowing from exterior to interior.

via: Mell Lawrence Architects & thanks to: CYMK Group

Pretty in pink

These brides certainly look like princesses in their dreamy pink color dresses. Lovely...

Marcio Kogan - Laranjeiras House

Marcio Kogan

Laranjeiras House

Here's one of Marcio's latest houses built in the Laranjeiras condominium, just south of Parati on the border of São Paulo and Rio states. Once again ultra wide openings and indoor outdoor flow prevail, yet this time the ultra sleek minimalism has be softened through more wood, vernacular roof tiles, a peaked roof and multi coloured curtains (take a look, it all works so well).


Laranjeiras, the sleekest beach condominium (in the Brazilian sense referring to a gated community) has some of the best beaches in the area and its own marina. Marcio's Du Plessis house is also in the complex. In contrast to Marcio's houses in São Paulo city, the security of this complex, has allowed him to open up the house to the views, pool and beach beyond.

The house faces north as an L with the games room and pool on the seaward side of the house. Large decks are once again shaded by wide overhands. The bedrooms have east-west doors for cross ventilation, as does the dining room and living areas. The bar and games room have north-south doors. In the corner of the L are the stairs, kitchen, service areas and maids quarters. Heading upstairs you find 6 bedrooms. Two doubles and the rest twins, each with ensuite and their own set of soft pastel coloured curtains for the bugs.

Catching an easterly sunrise across the beach must be fantastic from the upstairs balconies, yet on the days when you're not keen to rise early, the entire front section can be battened up to form a single wooden mass. This I presume would also help as this area could get hit by the odd storm. The lattice work railings surrounding the upper decks have almost a Burberry feel to them with their chequered pattern, providing privacy and protection whilst still allowing air to circulate.

Downstairs, although appearing open, can be closed up using hidden glass doors concealed in the stone/wooden walls. To the east, a short wooden deck to the sunken pool (for grip). Marble flooring extends out the west side of the house contrasting in texture and colour to the lawn beyond. Stone features again at the centre of the house, extending to surround the bar and games area, as a base for the lighter wooden structure above.




























via: marciokogan.com.br

Hiroaki Ohtani - Kobe Layer House

Hiroaki Ohtani

Kobe Layer House


Continuing the last posts stripy theme, which is about all these houses have in common, despite the Japanese link. This is Hiroaki Ohtani solution to infill in Japan.

The house is made up of pre-cast concrete strips, stacked unevenly to allow stairs, furniture and floors to be inserted in the gaps.
It's tight, claustrophobic, yet entirely open. There are no internal doors, apart from the sliding doors to the toilet.

Passing the tree in the courtyard, that brings irregualar form to this oterwise linear exterior, you enter on a landing, where you can either traverse to the bedroom, or head downstairs to the basement where a formal dining room and bathroom are housed.
Climbing up you reach the living room and galley kitchen with a steep set of stairs taking you to the roof deck, of which half is a glazed panel to bathe the main stairwell with light. The front of the house is a larged glass panel to let more light into the house and the rear wall has smaller window striped by the precast concrete.

Although flawed in size and solar capabilities, both in terms of heating the house and getting light in, it still seems warm with the living room and its pot bellied fire.















via: Architectural Review

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